Monday, February 18, 2013

Stick-to-it-iveness and a Giveaway!

by Roseanna White

(Who's appearing today wearing her writing hat rather than the editing one we typically see her wearing. This is Roseanna in her writing hat)


Roseanna M. White pens her novels under the Betsy Ross flag hanging above her desk, with her Jane Austen action figure watching over her. When she isn’t writing fiction, she’s editing it for WhiteFire Publishing or reviewing it for the Christian Review of Books, both of which she co-founded with her husband.

On her website, you can learn how to create your own spy name, and don't forget to enter in her massive Box of Secrets giveaway!
I'm what my agent fondly refers to as "an idea gal." I've got enough of them filed away in my IDEAS folder to keep me busy for a long, long time. And yet...so often after I finished one project, I would flounder around, wondering what in the world I should work on next.

Frankly, it got even worse after I learned I had a contract on my first big-press book, the colonial-set (or rather, just-after-the-American-Revolution-set) Love Finds You in Annapolis, Maryland. For the first time, I had deadlines and release dates that someone other than me set. And from learning of contract to release date was only 9 months apart. Once the emotional high wore off, the panic set in. And it took the form of a very simple question:

What in the world am I going to do next?

That, you see, is always the big question for a writer. It's never about getting that one contract. It's about building a whole career from it. So where could I go from there? I tossed out a few other ideas to Summerside, Annapolis's publisher, but they could only offer me vague "that might be nice someday" sentiments. So I sat down, I stared at my IDEAS folder. And I realized that none of it--absolutely none of it--worked as a follow-up to Annapolis. None had similar settings. None would require a similar voice. And that was kinda depressing.

But I'm the idea gal! I knew I could come up with something! So I trotted my little self down the stairs and said, "Hey, honey! You remember that episode of Decoded we watched, with that spy ring thingy-mabob during the Revolution? What was that called?"

My hubby: "The Culper Ring."

Me: "Thanks!"

Daughter: "Moooommmmmmyyyyyyy!"

Me, two hours later when I get to my computer: "Um....honey! What was that again??"


LOL, yes, my husband had to remind me about five times what the ring was called before I finally got around to looking them up and bookmarking the page. ;-) I figured another book set within 5 years of Annapolis would be a perfect follow-up. A perfect way to build a following. It wouldn't work for the Love Finds You line, probably, but I really liked the idea. I read some articles online and liked them even more.

Excited, I emailed an editor I'd been chatting with. "What would you think," I wrote, "about a Revolutionary spy romance?"

She emailed promptly back. "Oo, sorry! Siri Mitchell has one of those coming out next year!"

It was like somebody punched me. My great idea...and a bestselling, award-winning author had already beaten me to it. Le sigh. Le double sigh. Le boo-hoo-hoo. That was when I emailed Stephanie, totally down, with the bad news that those hours of brainstorming we had just put in were useless. I believe her response was something like, "Aw, seriously? Do you have to give it up entirely?" (Stephanie here: Note to self - be more eloquent when talking to Roseanna. My words might show up in a guest post...)

Given that I had no one else to pitch it to, I figured I did. At the time, my agent was mostly retired, she wasn't pursuing anything new for me, but I was afraid to cut totally loose from her. Which meant I was on my own in making connections. And they'd pretty much all tapered off.

Until, a month or so later - a rejection came in.

Yep. A rejection on a contemporary manuscript I'd submitted a year and a half earlier (a year and a half!)...and followed up on a year afterward...with an editor who also had six other proposals of mine that she hadn't looked at...she emailed to say she'd taken my contemporary to committee but gotten a "no" because of genre. I wasn't terribly surprised by the rejection. While I'd clicked nicely with the editor at a conference in 2009, she'd said up front that Harvest House wasn't really doing this type of contemporary. And honestly, I wasn't sure Harvest House would like my stories anyway--their stuff tends toward the sweet, and mine...doesn't always.

But, well, nothing ventured...I replied with, "Hey, I have this idea for a historical, following a spy ring during the Revolution. Would you be interested?"

She replied with an enthusiastic yes and invited me to submit when I had a proposal finished. I was still a good ways out from that, though. I had a manuscript to turn in to Summerside, and then I had to do some serious research. So I did. I wrote the proposal. I sent it to my critique group. Their responses were mostly positive, but with concerns about the amount of suspense...and the amount of backstory...and the way the heroine came off...

At this point, I was beginning to feel a bit discouraged. I had one book coming out aside from my small-press biblicals, but would that be it? Was I going to totally ruin my one shot at this story? Unsure how it would go, I made the changes I could to the proposal based on my critters' feedback, and I composed a new email to the editor.

I remember hovering with my mouse over the SEND button, thinking, "Is it good enough? Or is it awful? Should I wait? No, there's nothing more I can do to it. And she won't read it for months anyway, so if I come up with something else, I'll just send her an updated file." I clicked.

An hour later, I got an email from Kim at Harvest House. I opened it up, expecting it to say, "Got it, thanks." It didn't. It said, "Read the proposal. Can we chat? Our toll free number is..."

That would be when my hands started shaking. When my pulse skyrocketed. When my palms went damp. Because I knew well an editor wouldn't ask me to call just to tell me she hated my proposal. I called Kim, listened to her gush about how much she loved the story...I called my agent to share, and got a quick response of, "Roseanna, dear, it's time to find a new agent. I'll put in a few calls for you." In the next two weeks, I talked on the phone with three of the top agents in the CBA and ended up signing with the legendary Karen Ball, who had just gone from editing to agenting (she's the one who discovered Francine Rivers and Karen Kingsbury--just sayin'). And I kept writing. 

I sent it in several chunks to an ever-more-excited Kim. And learned that she, for the second time in her 15 years at Harvest House, was taking it to committee without having read the full book. So in the fall of 2011, I got the email--they had bought the series. My first series!

And you just can't believe how many times I almost gave up on this--the idea that had already been done (though very differently), the idea that my critique group wasn't totally sold on, the idea that had only one shot. The idea I loved, and which ended up getting better responses from agents and editors than anything I'd ever tried to pitch before. And to think I sold it to an editor I'd met a year and a half earlier, and who rejected my first project...

Well, in this business, you just never know. ;-) But now the Culper Ring Series is well under way. Ring of Secrets is available, Whispers from the Shadows (book 2) has been turned in, and I'm working on the final installment now.

Which leads to the fun giveaway! I'm offering a copy of Ring of Secrets to one commenter, of course, but we have a secondary giveaway too. The winner will get to name a character in the third Culper Ring book, and will have their name mentioned in the acknowledgments for it!

The character is my heroine's brother, who died fighting for the Union at Gettysburg. Though he isn't actually in the story, he's mentioned over and over again, as he was my heroine's best friend--and the promises he made her and another character make are a major plot point. My only condition is that it be a name appropriate to 1865, and that it not be one I've already used elsewhere in the series. ;-)

For your chance at the book or the name, just leave a comment below answering the question, do you find story ideas an easy or difficult part of writing?

(The book is available to U.S. residents only due to the unfortunate realities of expensive international shipping. This giveaway closes on Friday the 22nd.)


97 comments:

  1. I am SO laughing at you putting up a picture of me in my "writing hat." ;-) And yes, one just never knows when what you say to me might end up in a blog post, mwa ha ha ha!

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  2. Fantastically fun article, Roseanna! I'm tempted (really, really tempted) to put aside my current read and just go for Ring of Secrets :) I'd like an entry in the naming the character contest.

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    1. LOL. I would be the voice on your shoulder saying "Do it! Put the other aside and read this one!" but that would be a bit rude of me toward whatever other author you're reading, so I'll just say, "Read fast!" ;-)

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  3. I think I need to create my own idea folder! lol Great post, Roseanna! I cannot wait to read Ring of Secrets. :D

    And good luck to everyone entering!

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    1. I used to just collect them all in my head, but at a certain point it seemed prudent to start putting them down. Namely, after I forgot a few things I thought I never would, LOL. =)

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  4. Story ideas? When I have Writer's Block and want to write on something else, I can slam my head against the desk and no ideas come to mind. It's when I'm enthusiastically writing on a good story that I get six to ten OTHER good story ideas...and have to suppress the urge to write on THEM instead. So I just keep notes and plot them out. They're hard to come by sometimes, and sometimes they just come in FLOOD. XP

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  5. Story idea's seem to come pretty easy for me most of the time. The trick is throwing out the bad ones and keeping only the best. I also have trouble writing them down, they stick fine in my head, but I can't seem to remember them all when I sit down to write a list of my ideas.

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    1. Yeah, sometimes they definitely work better in-the-head than when you try to put them to paper or screen, LOL.

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  6. I tend to draw ideas from the tiniest of things! An artwork, song, comment, weather... you name it!! XD And somehow I manage to string out an entire plot with characters ta boot!

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    1. The beautiful mystery of a writer's mind. =)

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  7. Sometimes I can't come up with any ideas, but right now I have 5 novel ideas and one series idea. Sometimes it's really easy for me! I get most of my ideas from "what if" questions and strangely dreams. So over all it's pretty easy.
    Great post!

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    1. Me too! They're the best.


      ~Natalie Noel~


      Www.indianawriterblog.wordpress.com

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  8. Initial ideas for stories/characters bombard me constantly - its getting the ideas to work together, and finding time to write all of them that's hard!! But generally I have loads of ideas, and just have to sort through them, lol :) and yes, I have an ideas folder too!! :D great minds think alike...

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  9. Ideas are the hardest thing ever for me. I get characters... Who usually have to stick around for about two years before I find out what their story's about. At that point, it's not too difficult to write the story because I know them so well.

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    1. I love character-driven stories, so that's my favorite way to go too!

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  10. My only writing is in the form of blog posts...but the good ideas are not always there for me.

    I would be thrilled to read your latest! I had not heard all of the details (arghhhh) from this post before. Love hearing about it!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Annette! And yeah, some arghhs in the process, but once it hit, it really hit! Thanks for stopping by, my friend. =)

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  11. I can't wait to get the chance to buy this book! (I'm from Canada and, therefore, not elligible for the giveaway. *sigh*) I tend to get lots of ideas while reading other books. Of course, this caused some of my earlier ideas to be blatant rip-offs, but you gotta start somewhere. :)

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    1. I daresay we all started there, LOL. And you're still eligible for the naming part of the contest, at least!

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  12. Story ideas? Hmmm. Well, I have tons of ideas. I stash them all in a secret folder titled Pandora's Box (because you never know what will happen if you open it up)! But I find once I start writing that although the initial idea was easy to come up with, it's usually just a premise, the start of an idea, and fleshing out the whole story is the difficult (but fun) part.

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  13. I love coming up with story ideas, it's finding ideas good enough for their own novel that I find difficult [smile]. Whenever I can't sleep at night I make up stories in my mind. More than once I've gone stumbling around in the dark for pen and paper so as not to lose the idea.

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    1. That's my favorite brainstorming time. =)

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  14. What a coincidence :) I have a story idea folder too. Sometimes I think I have more than enough ideas to last me FOREVER. Then, of course, there is the fact that I started collecting the ideas in fourth grade. Therefore I realize (every time I go to look at my folder) that in order to write those stories I would have to start writing for a way younger age to pull it off. But I still believe that the ideas part is always the easiest. Once I have one idea, I spin off of it and write little companions for it that follow different characters.
    -Alyson Dow

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    1. Yeah, I still have some from primary school too. For the most part I've resigned myself to forgetting those, but you'd be surprised at how they occasionally crop up and integrate themselves elsewhere!

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  15. ...finding the ideas is easy, but making the story is difficult:)I get a lot of my ideas from my history book and keep them on an index card (which I have no idea where it is right now) labeled "a novel idea." Thanks for the post, Ms. White!

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    1. I did that too! Quite a few of my story ideas came from history class.

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  16. I seem to get story ideas from the weirdest things (a dream, a random comment) and during the weirdest times (washing the dishes), but they always came to me when I least expected it. I've never actually had to sit down and force myself to think up a story idea. At the moment, I have so many story ideas, I'm trying to stop myself from coming up with any new ones. It's the fleshing out of those ideas that becomes the tricky part.

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    1. The ideas can just be so addicting... ;-)

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  17. I guess I'm an idea girl too! I always seem to be coming up with fun ideas for stories but I'm a pretty terrible writer so that's all they ever are-ideas.

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    1. Writing, at least, can be learned. Creativity, not so much. So I think you'll be just fine!

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  18. Story ideas are strange things. They can show up whenever, with or without an invitation (usually without!). I find that getting ideas is not necessarily easy. For me, I have to be not thinking about it for the plot bunnies to show up. They almost always come when I don't have "must think about story" at the front of my mind. I guess I'm like Kiri Liz. :) Ideas show up when I least expect it and from the strangest sources.
    ~Robyn Hoode

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    1. That's how it used to be for me too. Though I've had to learn how to harness them on demand now that I have editors and an agent asking me for things, LOL. Quite a shift, that one!

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  19. I have a lot of ideas for stories, but I don't have a lot of ideas for their middles and endings. Still, I often break from whatever I'm working on to write the first ten pages so that when I go back later I can either steal some writing to put in a different idea, or I can keep going with the story and have a sample of voice and circumstance to work from. Your story is really inspiring, I'll definitely read this series! Thanks for the post!

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    1. So glad it inspired you, Kaitlin! This journey is often a long one, but when the right thing clicks, it can click so perfectly...

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  20. My mom had always told me I have more sticktuitiveness than anyone she knows :). I'm glad you stuck with it, sometimes it can hard to know what is and isn't sticking with.

    As for ideas, eh, it's something is struggle. I don't think it's ideas I struggle with but developing and making them big enough. I can come up with "what if x,y,z?" Or "how about this and that?" Which might sound great in a small increment but working everything out is hard. I need help brainstorming and its something I've been praying about and looking for, like a writing mentor. There are times I get caught in my circle of thinking and need fresh eyes

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    1. I've found critique partners to be an incredible blessing when it comes to brainstorming. I've never had a mentor, per se, but those writing buddies that you can email your every random thought to are invaluable!

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  21. I find story ideas easy... so far. I haven't been writing for that long, so I might eventually run out. Who knows? But at the moment I have several plots for novels lined up... all of them in different genres. *Sigh*

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    1. And testing out different genres when you're starting out is great! It lets you discover where your passion really lies and what you're best at. I've written quite a few myself, LOL.

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  22. The story ideas are defiantly the easy part, its just how to write them that gets me.

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  23. Wow. What an eccentric writing hat! I usually end up with my super-soft polka-dot blanket and my pen in my mouth... ;D

    As to the question, I find it more difficult to come up with a plot story. Inventing and naming characters is my favorite part! But discovering a good plot story is the hardest for me, because I'm afraid of writing a story that too closely resembles someone else's. One article on this site mentioned that no story is 'original,' you just discover a new way to retell it. I like that. Thankfully, my sisters are great at giving me ideas.

    I'm very excited to enter this giveaway, the book sounds great!

    Blessings,
    Sarah

    http://sarah-plainandaverage.blogspot.com/
    http://threemaidens.blogspot.com/

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    1. LOL. Can't say as I've worn that hat to write in either--it's HEAVY! But I did make my sister wear it to a book signing in a mall last year to drum up attention... ;-)

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  24. I used to find it easy to come up with story premises - it was developing them into full novels that was hard.
    Now I'm worried I've become the opposite. When I finished the first draft of my WIP, I needed to take a break and start a new project - the only question was, what?
    It almost scared me, how difficult it was to just start writing a random idea like I used to be able to. But nevertheless, I still have enough ideas floating around for me to be occupied for quite some time :)

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    1. Oh, and I'm not entering the competition, since I live in NZ.

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    2. You can still enter the naming part of the contest! =) And I totally get where you're coming from. As fun as it can be when you're in a "start new things" stage, that blank screen can be darn intimidating when you've been involved in a WIP for months!

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  25. Story ideas aren't difficult for me to come up with. At any given point in time, I've got a ridiculous number of sticky notes with ideas on them stuck in random places around my room. It's the fleshing them out to the point of being big enough for a story that is more difficult for me.
    But my favorite thing has got to be when two unrelated ideas suddenly click together. Like if I find out two characters know each other, one plot idea helps complicate another, etc. That's so exciting for me!
    Also, I'm not a hat person, but I feel like wearing a hat would really enhance my writing...if only because I feel adventurous wearing something on my head ;)

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    1. I love that too! My favorite was when I realized two displaced characters from a novel that was going nowhere would work perfectly in a new premise I had set up upon request. Made me so excited!

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  26. What a neat road to publication. Not easy, but a great story and encouraging to read. Thanks for sharing.

    Like a lot of people have said already, coming up with ideas is never a problem with me. Whenever I'm working on a novel I have to force myself not to dive into a new story and abandon my WIP.

    Love the idea for the second giveaway! :)

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    1. So glad it could encourage you! It is indeed a long and difficult road sometimes, but the best journeys usually are. =)

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  27. The idea stage is my favorite, but I honestly can't call it easy or hard. I'll have tons of ideas that just hit me and seem to build themselves until I have a whole four-book-series outline set. Then there are others, like my Little Mermaid retelling right now, that are partial ideas I love but can't seem to get anywhere with and just keep hitting walls and having to backtrack.

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  28. I am so excited for you! I can't wait to read your book! Thank you for the review and giveaway so much! I love it when you have new books. I know that God has many great and wonderful things in store for you, Mrs. White!

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    1. Awww, thanks. =) I hope you enjoy this one!!

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  29. Great post! Haha I love the hat! I'm excited for the giveaway!

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    1. Why thank you. =) I bought it solely to wear for costume stuff, but that included a writers conference awards banquet, which means Stephanie got pictures, LOL.

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  30. Wow, that's so neat! I love the story behind your book. You just never know what's going to happen, and what's going to affect your book.

    This is a wonderful giveaway- both of them!

    Thanks for the great post!

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    1. Thanks, Bethany! You really do never know--that's why I always tell people to build connections, don't just wave it off if one book gets rejected. Neither of the editors I sold to bought the FIRST thing of mine they'd taken to committee. It was the second.

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  31. Story ideas... in a way it's hard to find an idea big enough and great enough. But sometimes--like in the story I'm working on now--I just get a teeny tiny bit of an idea and I love it so much that I turn it into something huge.
    Thanks so much for this post!

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    1. Always so great when that happens! Thanks for stopping by!

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  32. I love-love-love having this huge list of story ideas. Realizing how much I may have to turn to it actually makes me feel a lot better about how complex the publishing industry is. Thank you so much for the post!

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    1. That list is vital! Keep it growing! I was always kind of amused/embarrassed by my huge list of ideas, but my agent says that makes me a dream--she knows that no matter what need she tosses my way, I either have or can come up with something to suit!

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  33. Story ideas can be SO difficult, yet other times just flow so easily. I can't imagine how any real published authors do it, because they publish over and over again and I don't know how they have enough ideas to fill up those books. I'm beginning to think that after the book I'm writing now, I won't have any ideas left. I have maybe three others "in storage" but they need a huge amount of polishing! Good luck, Roseanna :)

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    1. Thanks, Hannah. =) And while sometimes it can be a challenge to not repeat yourself in stories, for the most part, each BIG idea requires a unique set of smaller supportive ones, so they come more easily. Mostly, LOL.

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  34. Wow that's an amazing and inspiring story, Roseanna. I have a story concept that has similarities to a few others yet very different too, but I'm really confident and in love with the idea. I'm going to be pitching it soon at a conference. :D Story ideas come pretty easy for me. I don't have a ton and I've had some that I've scrapped and used bits from for other stories, but I think I have about five or six that have big enough plots to take off. Usually they come to me in dreams and then I brain storm them and they turn into something. :)

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    1. Fun! And good luck on that upcoming pitch!!

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  35. How do you know when to give up waiting? Like when an agent requests the full manuscript but doesn't reply for months and months, when do you give up?

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    1. Well, after several months it's usually time for a followup. If several months after THAT you still don't hear back, it may be time to write it off--unless they gave you a good response before but then were silent. That may just mean they haven't gotten to it yet! It's really hard to tell, because long after we give up something, we may in fact hear back, LOL.

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    2. thank you so much!

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  36. Oh, I'm definitely with Roseanna on this one! I have 8 (9?) empty binders (I write by hand and so keep each story in a separate binder) and have Oh... 2 completed first drafts. I definitely get story ideas faster than I write them, and when I finish, I'll sit for weeks (or months!) before I'll start something else (even if it's a sequel), because it's just needs to "develop a little."

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    1. I have...oh dear...looks like about 60 items in my WIP/IDEAS folders, LOL. Some of these I know I'll never work on, some of them are already bought and just waiting for their turn, some are sequels, and some are "Someday I WILL write this!" ideas. =) So yeah...if only the time to write were so abundant! LOL

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  37. Like Rebekah said above, I like thinking of ideas when I can't go to sleep at night. And I make up characters and scenes then too. Ideas are pretty easy, but coming up with a plot for them is really, really hard.

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  38. Hi, Mrs. White,
    I loved this post. :) I read Annapolis, Maryland and fell in love with it and am eagerly awaiting the release of Ring of Secrets! Actually, when I read the title of book 2 in the series, I did a little happy dance lol. :)
    To answer your question, I think story ideas are a bit difficult for me. My favorite part of writing is character development. I'm learning that a lot of times various things that have happened to the character shapes the character, and those things can play into the story (even if I'm the only one who knows it heehee), so story development is slowwwlllly getting better for me.
    Thanks for this post!
    ~Whitney
    P.S. Stephanie - not sure if you remember me since I haven't commented or entered contests in a while, but I'm still reading this awesome blog! Loving the posts and excited that your following is wider. :) Your "character strengths" post from the other day was quite helpful. :)

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    1. Lol, Whitney. When I saw your comment (before I saw the bottom part) I was like, "Hey, Whitney's back!" Glad to hear you're still hanging out with us, even if it's quietly :)

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    2. Well, you sure know how to make my day. =) And I'm glad the post was encouraging! You're very right about how character development can play into plot development, too. I was reflecting on that just yesterday as I thought back on what I'd first thought Circle of Spies (book 3) would be like, and how it's changed because I gave my heroine a very different attitude. =)

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  39. You have a Jane Austen figurine? Well, that's awesome. And I absolutely love love love your story! And now I really want to read these spy books... guess I'll head over to one of the best places in the world, online book depository! Does anyone else go there? They're in the UK and postage is FREE!

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    1. I literally read that and heard music in my head! Thanks soooo much for sharing that, I live in the UK too :)

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    2. The Jane Austen figurine was a Christmas present from Stephanie one year. =) I opened it up and started laughing with pure glee...

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    3. Chhoco -- I don't actually like in the UK, I live in Australia but mate the UK that's awesome!
      And Roseanna that is a very awesome present.

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    4. Australia?!?! So jealous!!! :) you guys have waaaay better weather than we do ;)

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  40. From Amo Libros:
    I haven't even read the post yet, but I have to say I LOVE YOUR HAT!!!!

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    1. Why thank you. =) I bought it for an annual Croquet tournament where everyone dresses Edwardian, and broke it out for the ACFW conference since I can get away with these things as a historical writer. ;-)

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  41. For me, generating story ideas is a very difficult part of the writing process. I so wish I could have tons of ideas waiting to be written!

    Thanks for both giveaways...and I love the character naming idea!

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  42. Story ideas come hard to me. :) LOVE the character naming idea!!!

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  43. I come up with ideas and fragments of ideas all the time, and I keep a little notebook for them. It's fun to go through it and think "Oh, I remember when I thought of that," or "What on Earth was I thinking?" or "Hey, that's not bad." :)

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  44. I'm drowned in story ideas constantly!!! It's actually the reason I've never finished writing a first draft! I'm writing and suddenly I get a new idea and whooosh! There goes that book and out comes another! I've finally actually almost finished a first draft but that took effort. My ideas came in a flash. In fact they got to the point where I couldn't even write them down! It was just one idea after another!

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  45. This has got to be the coolest giveaway in history. Not only a book, but a chance at naming a real live author's character? How awesome can you get?? Thank you so much, Roseanna! :)

    Ideas? Here's me typing away at a story: *click click click* *pause* This story is so dumb. *sigh*

    Then a lightbulb goes on over my head. Me: Oh my goodness! This is so epic! This is going to be IT! I am a genius!! *click click click* *pause* ... etc.

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    1. Wow, coolest one in history? In the face of that praise, I suppose I ought to confess that it was Stephanie's idea, LOL. =) And I grinned at your description. Who hasn't been there?

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  46. Story ideas are difficult to come across, but harder than that is finding the motivation to encourage the idea to grow into a book. Ideas can not be controlled, but the hard work it takes to bring life to your idea is completely under your control.

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  47. I loved this post :D That was such a great story and it is always inspiring for me to hear publishing stories. Like (in my head) "once upon a time those big authors I hear about and read their books, they once had a story like this" or it might be the actual story coming from one of those authors :D That is an amazing giveaway! I think that ideas come neither easy nor hard for me. Somewhere in the middle. I will be writing and suddenly a plot idea will come up. Or an idea when I'm actually trying to think about the next step in my next few chapters. Something that will change it up and add twists. But sometimes I feel so dry and like I have nothing. However reading and just being open to letting crazy thoughts in is such a great way to get ideas, I think. Thanks for the giveaway! A book and a character...what great prizes!! I must pick up one of your books as soon as I can! I'm interested in this series, a lot! Sierra
    Keep growing beautiful!

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    1. Isn't it fun to hear these stories? I always love them too. =)

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  48. Your writing journey is inspiring, Roseanna. I especially love how your stories sort of interwove themselves into each other. :) Thanks for sharing this!

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    1. Thanks, Rachelle. And yeah, it's fun to weave them all together here and there. If pressed, I could even relate my historicals to my contemporaries, but my editor just laughs at that idea. ;-)

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  49. Great post!
    I definitely get ideas easily. I have a whole folder on my computer just for story ideas, not to mention all the "brilliant" ideas I started on but didn't finish... Yeah, story ideas are definitely the easy part for me. Turning them into actual stories is where it gets difficult.

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  50. Great post. You have an inspiring (and humorous) story! And thanks for the giveaway!

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