Thursday, May 29, 2014

Andy Griffith on Being a Good Loser

Jill here. My husband and I have been working our way through the Andy Griffith show on Netflix. I love this show. And I love little Opie. In a recent episode, Opie was gearing up to win a medal for running a race. And that was about the order he had put things in his head too. He wanted that medal more than he wanted anything else. But when the race came along, he lost. And he was a sore loser.

But Andy gave him a talking to, and while Opie didn't come around right away, he did eventually. And this quote stuck with me:



The way Opie felt about winning that medal is how a lot of authors feel about getting published. We dream about it. We think about it day and night. We hope. And we train (by writing). But maybe it hasn't happened yet. Or maybe you have a friend who has been published before you.

We might not have a choice as to when or if we ever get a book contract, but we do have a choice as to how we will act and treat our friends that do. We can respond with bitterness, condensation, and cruel criticisms and be a sore loser like Opie was in the episode, or we can put a smile on our faces, congratulate our friends for their successes, and be truly proud of them. That's a lot harder, but it makes us better people.

Have you ever  been a sore loser? I have. But I've also had times where I was a good loser too. And the latter feels a whole lot better, doesn't it?

17 comments:

  1. This post made me smile :) Book publishing is such a subjective business; it's impossible to win all the time. It's important to remember to accept losses and move on.

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  2. The good thing is that there can more than one winner in writing. :) I'm still on the first draft of my first I'm-gonna-stick-with-it novel, so I don't know how rejection feels - yet. I hope I'll be a good loser when the time comes. :)

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  3. When I hear about somebody signing with a publisher or agent, I think, "Oh, how I wish it was me". But then, I realize that someone else's dreams are coming true and I cannot help being very happy for them! And Lord willing, someday I will be published! I just have to write a novel first. :)

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  4. Ahhhh, Andy Griffith. Good times...

    This post reminded me of the second Ellie Sweet book. That aspect of the book really...made me think, I guess. It can happen in any business. Just...sometimes it seems we can forget writing/publishing is a business and it's easier for it to get to ours heads, maybe.

    I love how Ellie's agent told her the best way to combat that getting-to-your-head-ness is to thank people. Such a simple thing, yet how much it can help. :) Thanks to Mrs. Morrill and Mrs. Williamson for sharing such wise advice!

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    1. You're so sweet, Amanda! I had actually heard my agent say something similar and I "borrowed" it for Ellie's agent :)

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    2. You are welcome. Thank you for your kind words. And the Ellie books are two that ever teen writer should read! And everyone should watch some Andy Griffith too, because it's just plain fun.

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    3. I guessed it was something like that, Mrs. Morrill ;) And agreed, Mrs. Williamson! My first memories of Andy Griffith are actually of writing a "Famous North Carolinian" report in third grade...it was a long time before I actually watched the show. :)

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  5. I love that show! :D I used to wonder how I would feel when my mom got her first book published, I was kind of concerned I would be jealous but it turned out I was just happy for her, that was a relief. :) I didn't think about what might happen next time... Haha! Thanks for the post! :)

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  6. I just saw this episode recently, too! Only I saw it on TV, not Netflix. :D Funny how that works out. Anyway, I loved that episode as well. Andy Griffith is so full of excellent advice, and he always delivers it in a way that penetrates. His methods were definitely better than Barney's...

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    1. I still loved Barney, though... :D

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    2. LOL! Barney was too late for me. My sister was afraid of him, but my kids liked him. I love Andy, thought. It's a fun show.

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  7. You guys are so wise. I love your comments!

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  8. Love Andy Griffith! To be honest, my initial reaction is often a twinge of jealousy when I hear of someone else getting published or getting an agent or whatever. But then I shrug it off because I know that, if I'm patient and keep writing, someday it'll be me.


    Alexa Skrywer
    alexaskrywer.blogspot.com

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  9. I get that little feeling a lot when I read published books and I'm like 'My book is better than this, why did they get a contract and I'm still trying?'. Instead of focusing on my jealousy, I try to put my effort into becoming a better writer and maybe someday earning that as well.

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