Thursday, May 14, 2015

Terry Pratchett on the Imagination

Jill here.

There are all kinds of readers out there. And there are all kinds of books. This is good. But sometimes, a reader stumbles onto the wrong kind of book, and for whatever reason, they read it anyway. This sometimes results in a surprise. It's good for people to read widely and experience all types of books. More often than not, however, this results in an angry reader who knew better than to read that type of book in the first place. (These types of book reviews mean nothing. If it's not your regular genre and you have nothing good to say, don't review the book. Just don't.)

Anyway, my quote today comes from the late Terry Pratchett, a master in his subgenre of humorous fantasy.



I've found this to be true far too often. If you love to read, have mercy on authors who write outside your favorite genre. You should read unfamiliar genres every-so-often so that you'll be familiar with all types of writing, but don't get upset if you don't like something. In fact, I challenge you to do the opposite. Find something positive to say about every book you dislike. Because there is always something good you can focus on. This will be excellent practice for critiquing. Too many of us forget to say positive things along with our critiques.

So, let's have some comments below. Tell me:

1. The last book you read in a genre you typically dislike.
2. (Without ranting or being cruel) tell me something you really liked about that book, even if, overall, you disliked the book.

Ready . . . set . . . go!

24 comments:

  1. The last book I read in a genre I don't really like was Bad Girls Don't Die by Katie Alender. It was sort of horror (my least favorite genre), sort of suspense (a genre I somewhat like). Overall, the book was better than I thought it would be because I thought it would be terrible. I liked the mystery aspects of it.

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  2. I usually read historical romances and chick lit books. I think the last out of genre book I read was The Fault in Our Stars. I know everyone got really excited about it, but I thought it was okay. I really liked Augustus' character, though. He was very captivating. :)

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    1. Yes, I enjoyed Augustus's dialogue a great deal.

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  3. I finally pulled through The Fault in Our Stars. Typically I read fantasy/horror/urban/any combination of the above, and I didn't particularly care for the book, but everyone else is really excited, and I did like the way the suppporting cast didn't lay flat on the page.

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    1. Yes, the supporting cast was well-rounded, Kelsey.

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  4. Read The Hunger Games two weeks ago, even though I'm not a dystopian person. I actually enjoyed the characters far more than I thought I would. :D

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    1. I enjoyed that book as well. She had some really fun side characters.

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  5. I normally read historical fiction. Last September I read a speculative novel, Cress, by Marissa Meyer. The character development was splendid, and the otherness was unobtrusive. I found myself able to believe the world the author created.

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    1. I've read Cinder, but none of the others in the series. I enjoyed the storyworld too.

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  6. I usually read dystopia/sci-fi/occasionally fantasy, which is what I write. But recently I read Flygirl, a historical fiction book (I loathe historical fiction most of the time) and loved it! It shed light on a very interesting subject (the WASP project in WWII) and I loved the main character.

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    1. Ooh, how interesting, Aimee. I love when I learn things from historical fiction. It's much more interesting to learn that way than from reading most nonfiction. Ha ha.

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  7. Usually I read fantasy/romance but I read recently It Took a War by Emily Anne Putzke, a historical fiction book and I really liked it. Although I don't think I've ever read a book/genre that I HATED truly, because I love words so much. :P

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    1. I've never heard of that book, Emma. Thanks for sharing!

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  8. Love this post! As a fantasy girl, I felt brave the other day and tried a certain dystopian book called Captives, by one Jill Williamson. And I liked it a lot, even though I generally don't like dystopian. I wasn't familiar with the plot devices, but I liked it. : D

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    1. LOL! Well, thanks for taking a chance, Allison. ;-)

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  9. I've never been a big historical fiction fan, especially when it comes to stories set during World War II or periods of segregation in the United States. I was far from happy when I was assigned to read The Book Thief by Markus Zusak for an English project, but I fell in love with it. I honestly don't have a bad thing to say about the book other than it took a long time to read, but I shouldn't even complain about that. I never wanted it to end! The author did a fabulous job of foreshadowing, developed characters I absolutely fell in love, and triggered an intense emotional reaction. I won't be forgetting this book any time soon!

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    1. Oh, yes. I tried to read that for several months. I was stuck in the first one or two chapters. Then once I got into it, I couldn't put it down. It was really good. And so was the movie, really. It was worth the torture. :-)

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  10. I read Five Days in Skye by Carla Laureano, a contemporary romance (which is really outside my normal reading material). Loved it! It takes place in Scotland, which that (and I know the author) were the only draws for me. But I ended up enjoying the book immensely :)

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    1. Oh, cool. I read Carla's fantasy, but not her romance. I love books that take place in Scotland, though. :-)

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  11. I love this quote! I don't typically read contemporaries, but every now and then they surprise me in a fabulous way. Steph's books are a great example of that. And Jenny B. Jones too. Also, I'm currently obsessed with detective stories, but hadn't really read many since my Nancy Drew kick as a child. A few years ago, I picked up a Tasha Alexander book and I've been hooked ever since. Exploring genres can be so beneficial, but I agree with you. Sometimes we just aren't the ideal reviewer for a particular story.

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  12. I usually read dystopian but recently I read The Darkest Part of The Forest. It was the first book I've read about like the fair folk and fairies. It wasn't really what I was used to but I found the story line enticing. There were some aspects of the story that I really didn't like and thought it was weird but the overall plot was really good. I think I would explore more into this genre.

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  13. I regularly read in almost all genres, but I recently picked up Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein. It's a war story, which is one of the few I generally don't mess with, but I'm reading it because my book club is. One thing I noticed is that it has a lot of voice, and over time, the story really draws you in. All the same, I don't think I'll read too many more like it. It's just not a genre for me. :)


    Alexa
    thessalexa.blogspot.com
    verbsoitybookreviews.wordpress.com

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  14. I read the Divergent series last year, having heard glowing praise about it, but personally I was unimpressed. I found the books a bit bland. Shortly put, I was bored stiff and gave up after reading the second book. Of course, I know Divergent has its own die-hard fans, but I found that it just wasn't for me.
    I was unpleasantly surprised to find out at the end of the last book that Tris died(I skimmed through the last book just to read the ending).
    So far I like the concept of the dystopian genre, but Divergent just didn't cut it for me.

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