Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Jill Williamson's Journey To Publication


Jill Williamson is a chocolate loving, daydreaming, creator of kingdoms. She writes weird books in lots of weird genres like fantasy (Blood of Kings and Kinsman Chronicles), science fiction (Replication), and dystopian (The Safe Lands trilogy). She had a podcast/vlog at www.StoryworldFirst.com. You can also find Jill on InstagramFacebookTwitterPinterest, or on her author website.

When I was starting out, I loved hearing writers tell their journey to publication stories. There was something inspiring about how real most of these stories were. I never heard a "It was my first pitch and I got an agent and I sold a million books and now I have a movie" type of story. Sure, some authors had to wait longer than others to make their first sale, but I loved looking for the common thread in every story: hard work.

It's true, writing is hard work. But it's also fun. If you find yourself working so hard that you're no longer having fun, then I'd tell you to take a break and re-evaluate why you're doing it. It's important to pay attention to your feelings and what they are trying to communicate. "Hey, you. Stop and rest and listen."



So here is my story (as fast as I could tell it). You might have heard parts of this before, but this is the first time I've put it on video. (The second time, actually, because the first try I ended up with a twenty-seven minute video that I knew I'd never edit down to anything I could fairly call "short . . .")

Enjoy!




Do you relate to anything I went through in my story? Either in attitude, excitement, discovery, mistakes, research, or something else? Share in the comments.

I want to know your story too.

10 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh, YES, Jill! I totally remember the first time I came across that mysterious "unsolicited manuscript" phrase! So similar to my journey. I feel like I learned everything by trial and error.

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    1. Before the days of Twitter pitching. LOL Writing conferences were the only option beyond sending to the few agents or publishers who did accept unsolicited submissions.

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  2. That must have been so frustrating! I'll admit, I cringed a bit watching your pitch... that's totally something I'd do. XD I'm definitely going to work on that so if I ever do get to go to a writers' conference (Lord willing, that will happen someday) I'll be able to do a decent job! :P

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    1. I know! It was awful... :-P

      It helps to prepare in advance (and practice on others), but it also helps to just be able to have a simple conversation about your story. When I get nervous, I ramble, and that's common in writers. The best pitch I ever had was a simple conversation. It was SO MUCH EASIER too. That was a good day. Ha ha.

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    2. Does any writer really love pitching? I take comfort thinking that's a 'no'. :)

      -Ann

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    3. I haven't met any that do. I still dislike it a great deal. *shudders*

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  3. Ha, I can relate so much to this! That pitch was too close for comfort, so I'll just say thank goodness awkwardness can be lived down eventually. :P

    You're so right, we have to respect that writing requires work and practice. It's not a ticket to $$$$ and fame. Don't think we'd love it as well, anyway, if it were. Thanks for sharing your story more in-depth!

    -Ann

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    1. Yes, Steve and I have perfectly normal conversations now. In this regard, time was my friend. Ha ha. And, yes. Hard work makes success so much sweeter.

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  4. Ha ha! I made Steve Laube's eyes glaze over once too! This is a great video, thank you so much for sharing your story!

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    1. I think almost anyone seeking publication in CBA has talked with Steve at some point. He's like our Obi Wan Kenobi.

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