Friday, July 6, 2018

What’s one social media practice you recommend? (With Lindsay Franklin!)

Today is our last day with author Lindsay A. Franklin on the blog, but you can stay in touch with her through her author website, FacebookInstagram, or Twitter.

Lindsay has also written a devotional book for teen girls that my daughter loves. It's called Adored, and it's filled with wisdom and encouragement.

In an ever-changing world, we can be certain of one thing: we are beloved by God. Adored: 365 Devotions for Young Women tackles tough topics girls face, from bullying and social media to friendships and dating, all the while showing readers how infinitely precious they are in God’s sight.

We have one more question for Lindsay before she goes:


What’s one social media practice you recommend? How about one practice you wish authors would avoid?





Lindsay: Build relationships! Even though I'm an introvert and kind of shy in real life, I love being able to talk to people via social media. I have gotten to know my readers through Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and that's such a cool benefit of modern technology. As a reader, I find it a bit distasteful when authors are always singing their own praises via social media. I know it's tough for authors to find that line of how much self-promotion is too much (I wrestle with this myself), but some folks just have an arrogant vibe that turns me off right away. When I follow someone on social media, I'm looking for a genuine person who doesn't feel like a skeevy salesman.


Stephanie: I recommend shining the light on others as often as you can. Talk about books you love by authors you admire. That is a great way to build authentic relationships and also to bless your fellow readers. We don't need to feel threatened by sharing the love. Readers have time for more than one book!

As for something I wish authors wouldn’t do is the obsessive posting as a book releases … but then nothing else any other time. I completely understand posting more when it’s book release season, but I don’t think “feast or famine” is a very effective social media approach.


Shan: Like Steph, I wholeheartedly recommend cheering others on. Socializing from a place of gratitude and excitement is far preferable to pontificating from a position of criticism. While there are many things in this world that seek to divide us, books can be something that pull us together. A love of reading and a heart for story is something people of all different cultures and socio-economic groups, different religions and political persuasions can appreciate. If we’re good stewards of our social media spaces, we can cultivate relationships that open our eyes and extend our arms to people we wouldn’t have met otherwise. This isn’t to say you can’t use social media to share frustration, but use your platform for encouragement as well. For spotlighting others and for lifting up those people and causes you truly appreciate.


Jill: I recommend asking people questions. About anything that’s not political or trying to pick a fight. Just start a friendly discussion. Those types of posts have always been far more successful than anything I post about my own books.

I don’t like when authors post constantly, like five-to-ten posts a day. When my feeds are filled with post after post after post, I’m like, “Okay, I see you, already!” Honestly, one post a day is enough for anyone, in my opinion, two is fine, but too many can aggravate people.




What about you, writers? 

What’s one social media practice you recommend? And what do you wish authors would avoid?

11 comments:

  1. I really like all of your posts! And yes, author or not, too many posts from someone is irritating! Less is more ;)

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    1. *thoughts not posts* lol.

      As for myself . . . I think it's important to be engaging and relatable, but be happy. I think it's important to smile in your pictures and encourage others with your words and social media. The main thing I've noticed with a lot of authors is how they don't interact (I'm talking about small authors who have blogs or make posts, but then never reply to anything). It's just not . . . polite.

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  2. I agree with absolutely every one of these! I love when authors share other people’s books, because it makes them more readable to me than if I just saw it on amazon. “Stephanie likes this book, so it must be good.”
    I also agree that a person should be consistently present on their social media, but don’t overwhelm the feed. That goes for everyone. And engaging, “talk to me” posts are my absolute favorite, as well as posts that deal with an authors personal life moreso than the writing side of it.

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  3. I'm not on social media, but I have a blog. I do my best to post once a week, but that doesn't always work out. Being present, not excessive, is so important! I try not to over promote my books in my posts, only promoting if the blog topic can be expanded on by reading my book.

    A big pet peeve of mine is the blogger who just stops! No explanation! I have a sweet friend who is in college and unable to post, but she let us know ahead of time. That is something I so appreciate! Tell people in advance when you have to take a hiatus. You still have a life to live outside of writing, but when you invite others to share it, please let them know you need a break. They'll love you for it ;)

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  4. This has nothing to do with social media, but Lindsay, I love your bangs, and I'm very jealous of them. That's all :)

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    1. LOL! Thank you, Stephanie! I cut them myself, so if they ever look uneven, that's why. ;)

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  5. What a great question - and neat answers! I like how similarly all four of you answered the questions, and how you advocated for encouraging and building up other authors. I haven't used any form of social media (yet) as an author presence, and have only been blogging for a bit. But I have been following certain authors for a while, and have to say that I enjoy it when the platforms feel genuine. It's not all marketing, it's not all related to them or even their lives - they make the platform worth my time by making it more than just another pretty outlet for them - instead, it showcases who they are and what they care about beside their own works.

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    1. Wow, what a great point, True. It's easy to fall into making social media "just another pretty outlet."

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  6. I just wanted to pop in and say thanks for having me as a guest panelist this week, guys! I so enjoyed reading all the other panelists' answers and the thoughtful replies. You guys are awesome. :D

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    1. And we loved having you, Lindsay! Thank you so much for hanging out with us.

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    2. Thank you for sharing your thoughts this week, Lindsay!

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